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The Galaxy is a dangerous place, and sometimes you have to fight to survive. Whether the enemy takes the form of battledroids or stormtroopers, a dark Force-user or a rampaging rancor, you need to be able to defend yourself. Using blasters, vibroblades, and lightsabers, heroes regularly get caught up in blazing firefights, wild cantina brawls, and mesmerizing lightsaber duels. You can try to bluff your way out of a tough situation, attempt to sneak away when your opponent is distracted, or even dazzle an enemy with your charming personality. But when all else fails, nothing beats having a good blaster at your side.

This section details the combat rules, covering the basics first. The back end of the section looks at some of the more unusual strategies that heroes can employ, including using Vehicles in combat. Many special abilities and forms of damage that affect combat are covered in the Gamemastering section.

The Basics Edit

Combat Sequence Edit

Combat takes place in a series or rounds, with each character taking one turn each round. Generally, combat runs in the following way:

  1. The GM determines which characters are aware of their opponent at the start of the battle. If at least some combatants are unaware of their opponents, a Surprise Round happens before regular rounds begin. If there is a Surprise Round, each combatant starts the battle Flat-Footed. A Flat-Footed character doesn't add a Dexterity bonus to their Reflex Defense. Once combatants act, they are no longer Flat-Footed.
  2. The combatants who are aware of the opponents can act in the Surprise Round, so they make an Initiative check. In initiative order (Highest to lowest), combatants who started the battle aware of their opponents each take a single action (A Standard Action, a Move Action, or a Swift Action; no Full-Round Actions allowed) during the Surprise Round. Combatants who where unaware do not get to act in the Surprise Round.
  3. Combatants who have not yet made an Initiative check do so. All combatants are now ready to begin the first regular round. If all combatants were aware of their opponents when the battle began, there is no Surprise Round and this is the first step in the combat sequence. If there is no Surprise Round, no one starts Flat-Footed (Everyone was alert enough to be ready for a fight).
  4. Combatants act in initiative order.
  5. When everyone has had a turn, the combatant with the highest initiative acts again, and Steps 4 and 5 repeat until combat ends.

The Combat Round Edit

Each round represent 6 seconds in the game world. In the real world, a round is an opportunity for each character involved in Combat to take one or more Actions. Anything a person could do reasonably in 6 seconds, your character can do in 1 round.

Each round begins with the character with the highest Initiative check result and then proceeds, in descending order, from there. Each round uses the same Initiative order. When a character's turn comes up in the Initiative sequence, that character performs his entire round's worth of Actions.

For almost all purposes, there is no relevance to the end of a round or the beginning of a round. The term "Round" works like the word "Month." A month can mean either a calendar month, or a span of time from a day in one month to the same day the next month. In the same way, a round can be a segment of game tome starting with the first character to act and ending with the last, but it usually means a span of time from one round to the same Initiative number the next round. Effects last a certain number of rounds end just before the same Initiative number that they began on.

Actions in Combat Edit

Every round, on your character's turn, you may take a Standard Action, a Move Action, and a Swift Action (In any order). You may take a Move Action or a Swift Action in place of a Standard Action, but not the other way around. You may also take a Swift Action in place of a Move Action, but not the other way around. Finally, you may sacrifice all three of these Actions to perform a single Full-Round Action on your turn.

Full-Round Action
Standard Action
Move Action
Swift Action
Full-Round Action: A Full-Round Action consumes all of your effort during a given round, effectively replacing all other Actions on your turn. Some uses of Skills require a Full-Round Action to complete. Examples include bypassing a a lock (Using the Mechanics skill), searching an area for clues (Using the Perception skill), and entering a Force Trance (Using the Use the Force skill). A Full-Round Action can't span multiple rounds; for example, you cannot perform a Full-Round Action that replaces your Move Action and Swift Action in the first round and your Standard Action in the following round.

Standard Action: A Standard Action is usually the most important Action you'll take in a round, and it often consists of some sort of attack- swinging a Lightsaber, firing a blaster, throwing a punch, hurling a Grenade, and so on. You can perform one Standard Action on your turn.

Move Action: A Move Action represents physical movement. The most common Move Action is moving up to your speed score. Standing up from a Prone position, opening a door, and drawing a weapon are also Move Actions. You can perform one Move Action on your turn, or two if you give up your Standard Action.

Swift Action: Most Swift Actions enable you to perform your Standard Action. Examples include switching a weapon's mode and dropping a held item. You can perform one Swift Action on your turn, or two if you give up either your Standard Action or your Move Action, or three if you give up both your Standard Action and your Move Action.

Free Actions and Reactions Edit

Some Actions take such a negligible amount of time that they can be performed in addition to other Actions or they can happen out of turn:

Free Action: Free Actions consume almost no time or effort, and you may take one or more Free Actions even when it isn't your turn. Examples include calling out to your friends for help and taunting a foe. The GM puts reasonable limits on what counts as a Free Action. Reciting the epic history of the Rodian hunter clans takes several minutes (Or more) and therefore isn't a Free Action. You can't take Free Actions when you're Flat-Footed.

Reaction: A Reaction is an instantaneous response to someone else's Action, and you can use a Reaction even if it is not your turn. Examples of Reactions include making a Perception check to notice a bounty hunter sneaking up behind you and instantly activating a Force Power to absorb damage from an incoming blaster bolt. You may only take a single Reaction to any one Action or effect. A Reaction is always resolved after the Action that triggered it, though some Reactions (Such as the Negate Energy Force Power, or the Block and Deflect Talents) can affect the outcomes of the Action that triggers a Reaction.

Combat Statistics Edit

Several fundamental statistics determine how well you do in combat. This section summarizes these statistics.

Attack Roll Edit

Attacking is a Standard Action. When you make an attack roll, roll 1d20 and add the appropriate modifiers. If your result is equal to or higher than the target's Reflex Defense, you hit and deal Damage (See Damage below).

Your attack roll with a melee weapon or unarmed attack is:

1d20 + Base Attack Bonus + Strength Modifier

Your attack roll with a ranged weapon is:

1d20 + Base Attack Bonus + Dexterity Modifier + Range Penalty (If Any)

Base Attack Bonus: Your Class and level determine your Base Attack Bonus.

Strength Modifier: Strength helps you swing a weapon harder and faster, so your Strength modifier applies to melee attack rolls.

Dexterity Modifier: Since Dexterity measures coordination and steadiness, your Dexterity modifier applies to attacks with ranged weapons.

Range Penalty: A ranged weapon can attack a target at Point-Blank, Short, Medium, or Long Range. If you make a ranged attack against a target within the weapon's Point-Blank Range, you take no penalty on the attack roll; your penalty on attack rolls increases to -2 at Short Range, -5 at Medium Range, and -10 at Long Range.

Critical Hits Edit

When you roll a natural 20 on your attack roll (The d20 comes up "20"), the attack automatically hits, no matter how high the defender's Reflex Defense. In addition, you score a Critical Hit and deal double damage. All targets are subject to Critical Hits, even inanimate objects.

Automatic Misses Edit

When you roll a natural 1 on your attack roll (The d20 comes up "1"), the attack automatically misses, no matter how high the bonus on the attack roll is. Effects that negate an attack (Such as Block, Deflect, or Vehicular Combat) or cause an attack to automatically miss (such as a Destiny Point) can also negate a Critical Hit.

Damage Edit

When you hit with an attack, you deal damage that reduces the enemy's Hit Points (See Hit Points below).

Damage with a melee or thrown melee weapon is calculated as follows:

Weapon Damage + One-Half Heroic Level (Rounded Down) + Strength Modifier

Damage with a ranged weapon is calculated as follows:

Weapon Damage + One-Half Heroic Level (Rounded Down)

Weapon Damage: A hit always deals at least 1 point of Damage, even if penalties to damage bring the Damage result below 1.

One-Half Heroic Level: Weapons are simply more dangerous in the hands of powerful Heroes (And Villains).

Strength Modifier: When you hit with a melee weapon or thrown melee weapon, you add your Strength modifier to Damage. When you hit with a melee weapon that you are wielding two-handed, you add double your Strength bonus (If any) to the Damage. This higher Strength modifier does not apply to two-handed melee attacks with Light weapons.

Defenses Edit

Your Defenses represent your ability to avoid taking Damage and overcome attacks to the body and mind. You have three Defense scores:

Reflex Defense: 10 + Heroic Level or Armor Bonus + Dexterity Modifier + Class Bonus + Size Modifier

Fortitude Defense: 10 + Heroic Level + Constitution Modifier + Class Bonus + Equipment Bonus

Will Defense: 10 + Heroic Level + Wisdom Modifier + Class Bonus

Your Species, Talents, Feats, and Actions may grant additional bonuses to one or more of these Defenses. For example, Gamorreans gain a +2 Species bonus to their Fortitude Defense, while a character with the Improved Defenses feat gains a +1 bonus to all three Defenses.

Reflex Defense Edit

Your Reflex Defense (abbreviated Ref) represents how hard you are to hit in combat, and most attacks target a creature's Reflex Defense. If an opponent's Attack Roll equals or exceeds your Reflex Defense, the attack hits.

Heroic Level: Your Heroic Level is the sum of all levels you have in Heroic Classes (Jedi, Noble, Scoundrel, Scout, Soldier, Technician, Force Prodigy) and Prestige Classes (Such as Ace Pilot or Sith Lord). It does not include levels in the Nonheroic class or Beast class.

Armor Bonus: Your Armor Bonus is determined by the Armor you wear. If you are wearing Armor, add your Armor Bonus to your Reflex Defense instead of your Heroic Level. This represents the difference between using your innate skill to avoid injury and counting on your Armor to absorb the damage from incoming attacks.

Dexterity Modifier: Nimble targets are more difficult to hit than slow ones. Add your Dexterity Modifier to your Reflex Defense. If you are Flat-Footed or unaware of an attack, you lose your Dexterity bonus (But not a penalty) to your Reflex Defense. If you are helpless (For example, knocked unconscious), calculate your Reflex Defense as if you had a Dexterity score of 0 (-5 modifier).

Size Modifier: Smaller creatures are harder to hit than bigger ones. Apply the appropriate Size Modifier to your Reflex Defense (And only your Reflex Defense). Size Modifiers are as follows: Colossal, -10; Gargantuan, -5; Huge, -2; Large, -1; Medium, +0; Small, +1; Tiny, +2; Diminutive, +5; Fine, +10.

Fortitude Defense Edit

Your Fortitude Defense (Abbreviated Fort) represents your ability to resist the effects of Poison, Disease, and Radiation, as well as your ability to ignore effects that would incapacitate a normal being.

Heroic Level: Your Heroic Level is the sum of all levels you have in Heroic Classes (Jedi, Noble, Scoundrel, Scout, Soldier, Technician, Force Prodigy) and Prestige Classes (Such as Ace Pilot or Sith Lord). It does not include levels in the Nonheroic class or Beast class.

Constitution Modifier: Tougher, healthier targets are more difficult to hurt than weaker ones, so you add your Constitution Modifier to your Fortitude Defense. A nonliving target (That is, any target without a Constitution score, such as a Droid) instead adds it's Strength Modifier to it's Fortitude Defense.

Equipment Bonus: Some kinds of Armor provide an Equipment Bonus to your Fortitude Defense.

Will Defense Edit

Your Will Defense (Abbreviated Will) represents your willpower and your ability to resist certain Force Powers and other effects that attack your mind.

Heroic Level: Your Heroic Level is the sum of all levels you have in Heroic Classes (Jedi, Noble, Scoundrel, Scout, Soldier, Technician, Force Prodigy) and Prestige Classes (Such as Ace Pilot or Sith Lord). It does not include levels in the Nonheroic class or Beast class.

Wisdom Modifier: Strong-willed characters are harder to influence than weak-willed ones. You add your Wisdom Modifier to your Will Defense. When you are unconscious, you have an effective Wisdom score of 0 (-5 modifier).

Speed Edit

Your Speed tells you how far you can move with a single Move Action. Your Speed depends mostly on your Species, although certain kinds of Armor can reduce your Speed. Some creatures, Droids, and Vehicles have a natural Climb, Burrow, Fly, and/or Swim Speed in addition to their normal Land Speed. Any effect that reduces Speed affects all of a creature's movement modes unless noted otherwise.

Speed is measured in Squares. Each Square represents 1.5 meters (About 5 feet).

Fly: A creature with a Fly Speed is capable of flight, but not if carrying a Heavy Load (See Encumbrance).

Hit Points Edit

Hit Points (Abbreviated "HP") represents two things in the game world: the ability to take physical punishment and keep going, and the ability to turn a serious blow into a graze or near miss. As you become more experienced, you become more adept at parrying strikes, dodging attacks, and rolling with blows, such that you minimize or avoid significant physical trauma, but all this slowly wears you down. Rather than trying to keep track of the difference between attacks and how much physical injury you take, Hit Points are an abstract measure of your total ability to survive Damage.

As long as you have at least 1 Hit Point, you can act normally on your turn.

Second Wind Edit

If you are reduced to one-half your maximum Hit Points or less, you can Catch a Second Wind as a Swift Action. This Action heals one-quarter of your full Hit Point total (Rounded down) or a number of points equal to your Constitution score, whichever is greater. You can Catch a Second Wind only once per day. Certain Feats or Talents may allow you to Catch a Second Wind more often, but never more than once in a single encounter.

Only heroic characters can Catch a Second Wind; Nonheroic characters, creatures, objects, devices, and Vehicles cannot. Exception: A Nonheroic character that takes the Extra Second Wind feat can catch a Second Wind once per day.

0 Hit Points Edit

A creature reduced to 0 Hit Points moves -5 steps on the Condition Track (See The Condition Track below) and falls Unconscious (See Falling Unconscious below). However, if the Damage that reduced the creature to 0 Hit Points equals or exceeds it's Damage Threshold (See Damage Threshold below), the creature is killed instead (See Death below).

A Droid, object, or Vehicle reduced to 0 Hit Points moves -5 steps on the Condition Track (See The Condition Track below) and is Disabled (But can be Repaired). However, if the Damage that reduced it to 0 Hit Points equals or exceeds it's Damage Threshold (See Damage Threshold below), the Droid, object, or Vehicle is destroyed instead. A destroyed Droid, object, or Vehicle cannot be Repaired.

Damage Threshold Edit

Attacks that deal massive amounts of Damage can impair or incapacitate you regardless of how may Hit Points you have remaining. Your Damage Threshold determines how much Damage a single attack must deal to reduce your combat effectiveness or, in some cases, kill you. You Damage Threshold is calculated as follows:

Damage Threshold: Fortitude Defense + Size Modifier

Size Modifier: Creatures, Droids, and Vehicles larger than Medium Size gain a Size bonus to their Damage Threshold. This Size bonus is +5 for Large, +10 for Huge, +20 for Gargantuan, and +50 for Colossal.

When a single attack made against you deals Damage that equals or exceeds your Damage Threshold, but not enough to drop you to 0 Hit Points, you move -1 step along the Condition Track (See Condition Track below). If the Damage reduces you to 0 Hit Points, you are dead (See Death below).

Droids, Objects, and Vehicles: A Droid, object, or Vehicle reduced to 0 Hit Points by an attack that deals Damage equal to or greater than it's Damage Threshold is destroyed.

Spending a Force Point: If you are reduced to 0 Hit Points by an attack that deals Damage equal to or greater than your Damage Threshold, you can avoid Death by immediately spending a Force Point, even if you spent a Force Point earlier in the round. A character who spends a Force Point in this fashion remains at 0 Hit Points, moves -5 steps along the Condition Track (See Condition Track below), and Fall Unconscious (See Falling Unconscious below).

If a Droid is reduced to 0 Hit Points by an attack that deals Damage equal to or greater than it's Damage Threshold, it may spend a Force Point in this manner to be Disabled instead of destroyed.

Improved Damage Threshold: You can increase your Damage Threshold by taking the Improved Damage Threshold feat.

Falling Unconscious Edit

A creature pushed to the bottom of the Condition Track (See Condition Track below) or reduced to 0 Hit Points falls Unconscious. When you Fall Unconscious, you fall Prone and are unable to take any Actions. After 1 minute (10 rounds), you make a DC 10 Constitution check. On a success, you move +1 step on the Condition Track (See Condition Track below), regain Consciousness, recover Hit Points equal to your character level, and can act normally on your next turn (Although you start Prone). If the check fails, you remain Unconscious for 1 hour, after which you can attempt another Constitution check. You make a new Constitution check every hour until you regain Consciousness. If you fail by 5 or more points, or if you roll a natural 1 on your Constitution check, you are dead (See Death below). You can't Take 10 on the Constitution check.

If you fail a Constitution check to regain Consciousness, your Condition becomes Persistent (See Persistent Conditions below), which means you can't Heal Damage Naturally, and you can't use the Recover Action (See Recover below) until you've had surgery performed on you, or until you get eight consecutive, uninterrupted hours of rest.

An Unconscious character or creature subjected to a Coup de Grace attack (See Coup de Grace below) or an attack that deals Damage equal to or greater than it's Damage Threshold dies immediately.

A character or creature that receives any kind of healing while Unconscious immediately revives and can get up to fight again (But start Prone); the healed character or creature has a number of Hit Points equal to the amount of healing it received, and it moves +1 step on the Condition Track (See Condition Track below).

Droids: When a Droid is Disabled (The mechanical equivalent of being Unconscious), it moves -5 steps on the Condition Tack (See Condition Track below), falls Prone, and is unable to take any Actions. It remains inert and inoperable until Repaired. A Droid that is Repaired immediately reactivates and can get up to fight again (But start Prone). The Repaired Droid has a number of Hit Points equal to the amount Repaired, and it moves +1 step on the Condition Track (See Condition Track below).

Objects, Devices, and Vehicles: When an object, device, or Vehicle is Disabled (The mechanical equivalent of being Unconscious), it moves -5 steps on the Condition Tack (See Condition Track below) and no longer functions. It remains inert and inoperable until Repaired. A Repaired object, device, or Vehicle has a number of Hit Points equal to the amount Repaired, and it moves +1 step on the Condition Track (See Condition Track below).

Death Edit

A character or creature that dies cannot be brought back to life except under special circumstances (See the Revivify ability). Similarly, a destroyed Droid, object, or Vehicle cannot be Repaired.

The Star Wars galaxy is a vast and perilous wilderness, and heroes who fight against evil and tyranny sometimes make the ultimate sacrifice. When a hero dies, the only thing a player can do is bid their character a fond farewell and roll up a new one.

Natural Healing Edit

A living creature that gets eight consecutive, uninterrupted hours of rest regains Hit Points equal to it's character level. A living creature cannot Heal Naturally if it has any Persistent Conditions (See Persistent Conditions below), and a creature can only benefit from Natural Healing once in a 24-hour period.

In addition to the Hit Points gained from Natural Healing, a creature can regain additional Hit Points from First Aid or Long-Term Care.

Conditions Edit

Certain debilitating attacks reduce one's combat effectiveness instead of one's Hit Points. Examples include a Stun grenade blast, a forced march, a paralyzing venom, or long-term exposure to extreme temperatures. Multiple Conditions have cumulative effects and can quickly drive a creature from it's normal state to Unconsciousness, or Disable an otherwise functional Droid, device, or Vehicle.

Physically debilitating attacks are usually made against the target's Fortitude Defense, while mentally deliberating attacks target one's Will Defense. Either type of attack pushes the target along the same track.

The Condition Track Edit

A creature, Droid, object, or Vehicle not affected by any debilitating Conditions is assumed to be in a "Normal State," which represents one end of the Condition Track. Each debilitating effect to which it succumbs moves it one or more steps along the Condition Track. A creature pushed to the last step on the Condition Tack falls Unconscious (See Falling Unconscious above). A Droid, object, or Vehicle pushed to the last step on the Condition Track is Disabled until Repaired using the Mechanics skill.

When a device is pushed down the Condition Track, apply the indicated penalty on Skill Checks to any skill check made with the device.

When a Vehicle is pushed down the Condition Track, all of the Vehicle's occupants suffer the same penalties as the Vehicle itself until the Vehicle is either Disabled or Repaired. Penalties imposed by multiple Condition Tracks are cumulative; in other words, a Vehicle's occupants suffer the effects of their own personal Condition Tracks in addition to the effects of the Vehicle's Condition Track.

The Condition Track
Normal State (No Penalties)
-1 Step ↕ +1 Step
-1 Penalty to all Defenses; -1 Penalty on Attack Rolls, Ability Checks, and Skill Checks
-1 Step ↕ +1 Step
-2 Penalty to all Defenses; -2 Penalty on Attack Rolls, Ability Checks, and Skill Checks
-1 Step ↕ +1 Step
-5 Penalty to all Defenses; -5 Penalty on Attack Rolls, Ability Checks, and Skill Checks
-1 Step ↕ +1 Step
Move at Half Speed; -10 Penalty to all Defenses; -10 Penalty on Attack Rolls, Ability Checks, and Skill Checks
-1 Step ↕ +1 Step
Helpless (Unconscious or Disabled)

Removing Conditions Edit

You can improve your Condition by spending three Swift Actions to use the Recover Action, moving +1 step along the Condition Track. You can spend all Three Swift Actions in a single round, or spread them out across consecutive rounds. For example, you could spend a Swift Action at the end of one turn and two Swift Actions at the start of your next turn to move +1 step along the Condition Track. Certain situations may prevent you from spending Swift Actions to move toward a Normal State on the Condition Track (See Persistent Conditions below).

Resting for eight consecutive, uninterrupted hours usually removes all debilitating Conditions afflicting a creature and returns it to it's Normal State. Some causes of debilitation, such as Poison and Hunger, may prevent a creature from improving it's Condition or returning to it's Normal State until the cause of the debilitation is treated (See Persistent Conditions below).

Persistent Conditions Edit

Some hazards and attacks (Such as Poison and Disease) result in a Persistent Condition that cannot be removed except in certain circumstances. Any time a Condition is Persistent, you cannot use the Recover Action (See Recover below) to move steps up the Condition Track, and you do not regain any Hit Points from Natural Healing. However, once a Persistent Condition is removed by satisfying the requirements stating in it's description, you can move up the Condition Track and heal normally.

Persistent Conditions do not prevent you from moving up the Condition Track by means other than the Recover Action or resting for eight hours. For example, an Unconscious creature that fails it's first Constitution check has a Persistent Condition from it's injuries, but it still moves +1 step on the Condition Tack when it makes a successful Constitution check to regain Consciousness.

Multiple Persistent Conditions: Sometimes you are affected by more than one Persistent Condition. For example, you might be Poisoned after already suffering the effects of a Disease. In this case, you must satisfy the requirements for removing all these Persistent Conditions before you can move up the Condition Track.

Initiative Edit

In every round during combat, each combatant gets to do something. The combatants' Initiative checks determine the order in which they act, from highest to lowest.

Initiative Checks Edit

At the start of a battle, each player makes an Initiative skill check for their character. (A character can make an Initiative check Untrained.) The GM rolls Initiative checks for the opponents. All combatants act in order, from the highest Initiative check result to the lowest. A character's Initiative count remains the same for all rounds of the combat unless a character takes an Action that causes their place in the Initiative order to change (See Special Initiative Actions below).

The GM should write the names of the characters on a piece of scrap paper in Initiative order. That way, in subsequent rounds the GM can move quickly from one character to the next. If two combatants have the same Initiative check result, the character with the highest Initiative check modifier acts first. If there is still a tie, roll an additional Initiative check to determine between the two as to which character goes before the other.

To save time, the GM can make a single Initiative check for all of the opponents, rolling 1d20 and adding the lowest Initiative check modifier in the group. That way, each player gets a turn each round and the GM also gets one turn. At the GM's option, however, they can make separate Initiative checks for different groups of opponents or even individual foes. For instance, the GM may make one Initiative check for an Imperial Officer and another check for his squad of Stormtroopers.

Joining a Battle Edit

If characters enter a battle after it has begun, they make their Initiative check at that time and act whenever their turn comes up in the existing order.

Flat-Footed Edit

In any battle that begins with a Surprise Round (See Surprise below), you start the battle Flat-Footed. You remain Flat-Footed until your first regular turn in the Initiative order. You can't apply your Dexterity bonus (If any) to your Reflex Defense while Flat-Footed.

Surprise Edit

When combat starts, if you are not aware of your enemies, but they are aware of you, you're Surprised. If you know about your opponents, but they don't know about you, you Surprise them.

Awareness and Surprise Edit

Sometimes all the combatants on a side are aware of their opponents; sometimes none are; sometimes only some of them are. Sometimes a few combatants on each side are aware, and other combatants on each side are unaware.

Determining Awareness Edit

The GM determines who is aware of who at the start of a battle. They may call for Perception checks to see how aware the characters are of their opponents. Some example situations:

  • The mission team enters a cantina and immediately spots a gang of Rodians. Alert and watchful, the Rodians also notice the heroes. Both sides are aware; neither is Surprised. The heroes and the Rodians make Initiative checks, and the battle begins.
  • While exploring an abandoned armory, the heroes are being watched by a pack of Jawas. The Jawas lurk in hiding places, waiting for the right time to strike and defend their new lair from the intruders. Sia-Lan spots one of the Jawas as it tries to sneak behind a partially destroyed battle Droid. The Jawas shriek and leap from their hiding places, surrounding the heroes. The Jawas and Sia-Lan each get to act during the Surprise Round. The other heroes, caught unaware, can't act. After the Surprise Round, the first regular Round of combat begins.
  • The mission team advances down a dark corridor in the Space-Station fortress of Grumbog, an alien warlord, using Glow Rods to light the way. At the end of the corridor, three of Grumbog's soldiers have set up an E-Web Repeating Blaster. They fire the weapon, sending a powerful blast down the corridor. That's the end of the Surprise Round. After determining whether any of the heroes were hit, and calculating Damage, the GM announces that the first regular Round of combat begins. The mission team is in a tough spot, since they are facing a powerful weapon and still can't see who is attacking them.

The Surprise Round Edit

If some, but not all, of the combatants are aware of their opponents, a Surprise Round happens before regular Rounds begin. The combatants who are aware of their opponents can act in the Surprise Round, so they make Initiative checks. In Initiative order (Highest to lowest), combatants who started the battle aware of their opponents each take a single Action- a Standard Action, a Move Action, or a Swift Action (But not a Full-Round Action)- during the Surprise Round. If no one is Surprised, a Surprise Round doesn't occur.

Unaware Combatants: Combatants who are unaware at the start of battle do not get to act in the Surprise Round. Unaware combatants are Flat-Footed because they have not acted yet, so they do not apply their Dexterity bonus (If any) to their Reflex Defense.

Full-Round Actions Edit

A Full-Round Action consumes all of your effort during a given round, effectively replacing all other Actions on your turn. A Full-Round Action can't span multiple Rounds; for example, you cannot perform a Full-Round Action that replaces your Move Action, and Swift Action in the first Round and your Standard Action in the following Round.

Full-Round Actions include the following:

Coup de Grace Edit

As a Full-Round Action, you can use a Melee Weapon to deliver a Coup de Grace to a Helpless creature or Droid. You can also use a Ranged Weapon, provided you are adjacent to the target. You automatically score a Critical Hit, dealing double Damage. A defender reduced to 0 Hit Points by a Coup de Grace dies instantly, or, in the case of a Droid, is destroyed. An Unconscious or Disabled defender Hit by a Coup de Grace also dies or is destroyed instantly.

You can't deliver a Coup de Grace against a Vehicle or object.

Full Attack Edit

As a Full-Round Action, you can make more than one attack. To gain extra attacks, you must be wielding two weapons, wielding a double weapon, or using a special ability that grants extra attacks. When making multiple attacks, you may resolve your attacks in any order desired, declaring the target of each attack immediately before making the attack roll. Extra attacks granted from different sources are cumulative. Any penalties associated with gaining an extra attack apply to all attacks that the character makes until the start of their next turn.

Attacking with Two Weapons Edit

As a Full-Round Action, a character armed with two weapons can attack once with each weapon, but the character takes a -10 penalty on all attacks for the Round. This penalty assumes that the character is proficient with the weapon in hand; apply an additional -5 penalty on the attack roll if the character is not proficient with the weapon.

A character armed with three or more weapons still only gains one extra attack, but that character may choose which weapon it wishes to use for this extra attack each Round.

Attacking with a Double Weapon Edit

As a Full-Round Action, a character armed with a double weapon (Such as a Double-Bladed Lightsaber) can attack once with each end of the weapon, but the character takes a -10 penalty penalty on all attacks for the Round. This penalty assumes that the character is proficient with the weapon in hand; apply an additional -5 penalty on the attack roll if the character is not proficient with the weapon. (A character who chooses to attack with only one end of a double weapon can do so as a Standard Action.)

Dual Weapon Mastery Edit

The Dual Weapon Mastery I, Dual Weapon Mastery II, and Dual Weapon Mastery III feats reduce the -10 penalty on attack rolls when fighting with two weapons or both ends of a double weapon. (The penalty is respectively reduced to a -5 penalty, a -2 penalty, and no penalty)

Double Attack and Triple Attack Edit

The Double Attack feat allows a character to make one extra attack during a Full Attack, but the character takes a -5 penalty on all attacks until the start of their next turn. The Triple Attack feat allows a character to make one extra attack in addition to that granted by the Double Attack feat, giving the character an additional -5 penalty (For a total -10 penalty) on all attacks until the start of their next turn. If the character is armed with more than one weapon (Or uses a double weapon), they may choose which weapon (Or weapons) they will choose to make each extra attack.

Run Edit

You can Run as a Full-Round Action, moving up to four times your Speed in a straight line (Or three times your Speed in a straight line if wearing Heavy Armor or carrying a Heavy Load). See the Endurance skill for Running rules.

Standard Actions Edit

A Standard Action is usually the most important Action you'll take in a round, and it often consists of some sort of attack- swinging a Lightsaber, firing a blaster, throwing a punch, hurling a Grenade, and so on. You can perform one Standard Action on your turn.

A Standard Action could be any one of the following:

Attack with a Melee Weapon Edit

With a Melee Weapon, you can strike any target in a square you can threaten. Small and Medium characters threaten the squares adjacent to them. Bigger creatures may threaten a larger number of squares, as defined by their Reach (See Reach below).

Two-Handed Melee Weapons Edit

When you wield a Melee Weapon two-handed, add double your Strength bonus (If any) to the Damage. This higher Strength modifier does not apply to Light Weapons (Weapons smaller than your size).

Improvised Melee Weapons Edit

Sometimes objects not crafted to be weapons can be used: chairs, bottles, crates, and so on. Because these objects are not designed for such use, characters who use Improvised Melee Weapons are treated as not proficient with them and take a -5 penalty on their attack rolls. The GM determines the size and Damage dealt by an Improvised Weapon.

Attack with a Ranged Weapon Edit

With a Ranged Weapon, you can throw or shoot at any target within your Line of Sight if there are no obstructions (Including other characters) between you and the target. The maximum Range or a Ranged Weapon depends on the weapon used.

A Ranged Weapon can attack a target at Point-Blank, Short, Medium, or Long Range. If you make a Ranged Attack against a target within the weapon's Point-Blank Range, you take no penalty on the attack roll; your penalty on attack rolls increases to -2 at Short Range, -5 at Medium Range, and -10 at Long Range.

Improvised Thrown Weapons Edit

Sometimes objects not crafted to be weapons can be thrown in a dangerous manner: small rocks, vases, pitchers, Lightsabers, and so forth. Because these objects are not designed for such use, characters who use Improvised Thrown Weapons are treated as not proficient with them and take a -5 penalty on their attack rolls. The GM determines the size and Damage dealt by an Improvised Weapon.

Aid Another Edit

As a Standard Action, you can aid an ally's next Skill Check or Attack Roll, or you can interfere with an enemy's attacks.

Aiding a Skill Check or Ability Check Edit

You can help another character achieve success on their Skill Check or Ability Check by making the same kind of Skill Check or Ability Check in a cooperative effort. If you roll a 10 or higher on your check, the character you are helping receives a +2 bonus on their own check. You can't Take 10 on a Skill Check or Ability Check to Aid Another.

Aiding an Attack Roll Edit

In combat, you can Aid Another character's Attack by forcing an opponent to avoid your own Attacks, making it more difficult for them to avoid your ally. Select an opponent and make an Attack against a Reflex Defense of 10. If you succeed, you grant a +2 bonus on a single ally's next Attack Roll against that opponent.

Suppressing an Enemy Edit

In combat, you can distract or interfere with an opponent, making their Attacks more difficult. Select an opponent and make an Attack against a Reflex Defense of 10. If you succeed, that opponent takes a -2 penalty on it's next Attack Roll.

Attack an Object Edit

Sometimes you need to Attack an Object such as a door, a control console, or a held weapon, either to destroy it or bypass it. An unattended, immobile Object has a Reflex Defense of 5 + it's Size Modifier. If you hit it, you deal Damage as normal. However, an Object usually has Damage Deduction (DR), which means that any attack that hits it has it's Damage reduced by the indicated amount. (Lightsabers ignore an Objects Damage Reduction.) An Object reduced to 0 Hit Points is Disabled. If the Damage that reduces the Object to 0 Hit Points also equals or exceeds the Objects's Damage Threshold, the Object is destroyed instead.

Like characters, Objects become increasingly debilitated if they take a lot of Damage at once. If an Object takes Damage from a single attack that equals or exceeds it's Damage Threshold, it moves -1 step on the Condition Track. An Object that moves -5 steps on the Condition Track is Disabled.

Held, Carried, or Worn Objects Edit

A Held, Carried, or Worn Object is much harder to hit than an unattended Object, and has a Reflex Defense equal to 10 + the Object's Size Modifier + the Reflex Defense of the holder (Not counting Armor Bonus or Natural Armor Bonus, if any).

Multipart Objects Edit

Very large Objects have separate Hit Point totals for different sections. For example, you can break the window of an Airspeeder without destroying the whole speeder.

The Right Weapon for the Job Edit

The GM may determine that certain weapons just can't deal Damage effectively to certain Objects. For example, you will have a hard time breaking open a blast door with a Cesta or cutting a cable with a Club. The GM may also rule that certain Attacks are especially successful against some Objects. For example, it's easy to sheer or ignite a curtain with a Lightsaber.

Strength Edit

All Objects have a Strength score that represents their innate ability to bear weight (See Encumbrance). An Object supporting weight in excess of it's Heavy Load moves -1 step along the Condition Track immediately, and another -1 step each round on the same Initiative count. If an Object is supporting weight in excess of twice it's Heavy Load, it is immediately Disabled.

Breaking an Object Edit

When you try to break something with sudden force rather than dealing regular Damage, use a Strength check to determine whether you succeed. The DC depends more on the construction of the item than on the material, but it is usually equal to 15 + the Object's Strength modifier. Attempting to break an Object is a Standard Action. If the Object has moved down the Condition Track, apply the condition penalty to the Object's break DC.

Object Statistics Edit

Statistics for Objects
OBJECT DR HIT POINTS DAMAGE THRESHOLD STRENGTH (BREAK DC)
Manufactured Objects
Fine (Comlink) - 1 5 1 (10)
Diminutive (Datapad) - 1 5 1 (10)
Tiny (Computer) - 2 5 1 (10)
Small (Storage Bin) 2 3 6 4 (12)
Medium (Desk) 5 5 10 10 (15)
Large (Bed) 5 10 20 10 (15)
Huge (Conference Table) 10 10 35 20 (20)
Gargantuan (Small Bridge) 10 20 55 40 (30)
Colossal (House) 10 20 85 80 (50)
Tools and Weapons
Computer Console - 5 10 10 (15)
Weapon, Tiny (Hold-Out Blaster Pistol) 5 2 10 10 (15)
Weapon, Small (Blaster Pistol) 5 5 12 15 (17)
Weapon, Medium (Blaster Rifle) 5 10 15 20 (20)
Weapon, Large (Heavy Blaster Rifle) 10 10 17 25 (25)
Weapon, Huge (E-Web Repeating Blaster) 10 20 30 30 (30)
Bindings
Mesh Tape - 1 15 20 (20)
Liquid Tape - 2 19 28 (24)
Syntherope - 4 20 30 (25)
Chain 10 5 26 32 (26)
Binder Cuffs 10 20 25 40 (30)
Locks
Cheap - 1 5 1 (10)
Average 2 5 10 10 (15)
Good 5 10 15 20 (20)
High Security 10 120 30 50 (35)
Ultrahigh Security 20 150 35 60 (40)
Barriers
Metal Bars (2 cm thick) 10 30 25 40 (30)
Permacrete Wall (30 cm thick) 10 150 30 50 (35)
Metal Wall or Hull (15 cm thick) 10 150 35 60 (40)
Wooden Door (5 cm thick) 5 25 10 10 (15)
Metal Door or Airlock (5 cm thick) 10 50 30 50 (35)
Blast Door (50 cm thick) 10 750 40 70 (45)
Statistics for Substances
SUBSTANCE DR HIT POINTS
Paper (Flimsiplast, Durasheet) - 1
Rope (Synthetic, Liquid Cable) - 1 per cm of thickness
Soft Plastic (Synthmesh, Synthleather) - 1 per cm of thickness
Glass (Duraplex, Plastex) - 1 per cm of thickness
Ice or Delicate Crystal - 1 per cm of thickness
Ceramic (Ceramisteel) - 1 per cm of thickness
Hard Plastic (Duraplast, Plasteel) 2 2 per cm of thickness
Wood (Synthwood, or any Natural Variety) 5 5 per cm of thickness
Light Metal (Transparisteel) 5 5 per cm of thickness
Stone (Permacrete, Ferrocrete) 10 5 per cm of thickness
Metal (Durasteel, Quadanium Steel) 10 10 per cm of thickness
Heavy Metal (Duranium, Lanthanide) 10 15 per cm of thickness
Exotic Metal (Neutronium, Mandalorian Steel) 20 20 per cm of thickness

Charge Edit

As a Standard Action you can move your Speed (Minimum 2 squares) in a straight line, and then make a Melee Attack at the end of your movement. You gain a +2 competence bonus on your Attack Roll, but take a -2 penalty to your Reflex Defense until the start of your next turn. You cannot Charge through low objects or squares occupied by opponents (Allies do not hinder your Charge), and Charging through Difficult Terrain costs twice as much per square as normal. You cannot Tumble during your movement as a part of a Charge. After you resolve a Charge Attack, you can take no further Actions this turn (Although other Actions can be taken prior to the Charge).

Disarm Edit

As a Standard Action, you may attempt to Disarm an opponent, forcing them to drop one weapon (Or object) that they are holding.

Making a Disarm Attack Edit

Make a normal Melee Attack Roll against your opponent, who gets a +10 bonus to their Reflex Defense during this Action. If your opponent is holding the weapon with more than one hand, you take a -5 penalty on your Attack Roll to Disarm them, per additional hand grasping the weapon.

If the Attack succeeds, your opponent is Disarmed. If you successfully Disarm your opponent with an Unarmed Attack, you can take the Disarmed weapon (Or object). Otherwise, it falls on the ground at your opponent's feet (Inside their Fighting Space).

If your Disarm Attack fails, your opponent can immediately make an Attack of Opportunity against you (See Attacks of Opportunity below).

Improved Disarm Edit

If you have the Improved Disarm feat, you get a +5 bonus on your Melee Attack Roll to Disarm an opponent, and your opponent doesn't get to make any Attacks of Opportunity against you if your Disarm attempt fails.

Ranged Disarm Edit

If you have the Ranged Disarm talent, you can attempt to Disarm your opponent with a Ranged Attack. If the Attack fails, your opponent doesn't get to make any Attacks of Opportunity against you.

Fight Defensively Edit

As a Standard Action, you can concentrate more on protecting yourself than hurting your enemies. You can take a -5 penalty on your Attack Rolls and gain a +2 dodge bonus to your Reflex Defense until the start of your next turn. If you choose to make no Attacks until your next turn (Not even Attacks of Opportunity), you gain a +5 dodge bonus to your Reflex Defense until the start of your next turn.

Acrobatics Edit

If you are Trained in the Acrobatics skill, you instead gain a +5 dodge bonus to your Reflex Defense when you Fight Defensibly, or a +10 dodge bonus if you choose to make no Attacks.

Grab Edit

See also: Grappling 101

As a Standard Action, you can make a Grab Attack. A Grab Attack is treated as an Unarmed Attack (See Unarmed Attacks below) except that it doesn't deal Damage and you take a -5 penalty on the Attack Roll. You can only Grab an opponent up to one size category larger than yourself, and only one opponent at a time.

Until it breaks the Grab, a Grabbed creature takes a -2 penalty on Attack Rolls unless it uses a Natural Weapon or a Light Weapon. Additionally, it cannot Move until it breaks the Grab. Breaking the Grab is a Standard Action, and automatically clears one grabber per character level. (The grabbed creature chooses which grabbers it clears if there are any left over.)

Grapple Edit

See also: Grappling 101

A Grapple Attack is an improved version of the Grab Attack (See above). You can only make a Grapple Attack (A Standard Action) if you have a Grappling Feat (Such as Pin or Trip). You can only Grapple an opponent up to one size category larger than you, and only one opponent at a time.

A Grappling Attack is treated as an Unarmed Attack (See Unarmed Attacks below) except that it deals no Damage. If the Grappling Attack hits, you and the target immediately make opposed Grapple checks. A Grapple check is 1d20 + Base Attack Bonus + Strength or Dexterity modifier (Whichever is higher) + Size modifier (See below). If your check result equals or exceeds the target's check result, the target is Grappled.

The effects of a Grapple depend on the specific Feat or combination of Feats you are using (For example; Pin, Pin and Crush, Trip, or Trip and Throw).

Alternatively, if you are armed with a Light Weapon, you may deal Damage with that weapon if you win the opposed Grapple check; no Attack Roll is necessary.

Size modifiers for Grapple checks are as follows: Fine, -20; Diminutive, -15; Tiny, -10; Small, -5; Medium, +0; Large, +5; Huge, +10; Gargantuan, +15; Colossal, +20.

Move Actions Edit

A Move Action represents physical movement. The most common Move Action is moving up to your speed score. You can perform one Move Action on your turn, or two if you give up your Standard Action.With the exception of specific movement related Skills, most Move Actions don't require Skill Checks. In some cases (Such as shouldering a stuck door), Ability Checks might be required.

Move Actions include the following:

Move Edit

You can move up to your Speed as a Move Action. Even moving 1 square is considered a Move Action. Nonstandard modes of movement are also covered by this type of Action, such as Climbing or Riding an animal.

Draw or Holster a Weapon Edit

Drawing or Holstering a Weapon is a Move Action. If you are proficient in a weapon’s use, Drawing the weapon always includes any Action necessary to activate the weapon (Thus, a Lightsaber can be Drawn and activated as a single Move Action if you are proficient with the weapon).

Quick Draw Edit

If you have the Quick Draw feat, you can Draw or Holster a Weapon as a Swift Action instead of a Move Action.

Manipulate an Item Edit

Manipulating an Item includes picking up an item, loading a weapon, opening a door, or moving a heavy object.

Retrieving a Stored Item Edit

Retrieving a Stored item out of a backpack, carrying case, or other closed containers requires two Move Actions, one to open the container, and one to get the item. Holsters, Utility Belts, and Bandoliers are not considered to be closed containers for the purpose of this type of Action.

Stand Up Edit

Standing Up from a Prone position requires a Move Action.

Acrobatic Standing Edit

If you are Trained in the Acrobatics skill, you can stand up from a Prone position as a Swift Action with a successful DC 15 Acrobatics check.

Withdraw Edit

You can Withdraw from combat as a Move Action. To Withdraw, the first 1 square of your movement must take you out of your opponent's threatened area by the shortest possible route. If you must move more than 1 square to escape the threatened area, you can't Withdraw. You can move normally (Take a Move Action) in order to escape an opponent, but you provoke an Attack or Opportunity when doing so.

Once you clear the threatened area, you may continue to move, up to a total of half your Speed.

You can disengage from more than one opponent in the same Action, but only if you can clear all threatened areas in your first 1 square of movement.

Disengaging protects you from Attacks of Opportunity during your first square of movement, but you may provoke Attacks of Opportunity later in your turn (For example, you may move through another character's threatened area).

Swift Actions Edit

Things that require very little time of effort can be accomplished with a Swift Action. Some Actions, Feats, and Talents require one or more Swift Actions to perform. You normally get one Swift Action per Round, but you can take a second Swift Action instead of a Standard Action or Move Action, and you can take three Swift Actions in a Round if you give up both your Standard Action and Move Action. Multiple Swift Actions usually have to occur on the same Round, or consecutive Rounds, and some Actions require that the multiple Swift Actions be consecutive (That is, no other Action interrupts them). This is noted in the Action's description.

Swift Actions include the following:

Activate an Item Edit

A Swift Action allows you to activate an item. Starting a Vehicle, turning on a computer, and lighting a fusion lantern are all examples of Activating an Item.

Aim Edit

2 Swift Actions

You can take two consecutive Swift Actions in the same Round to more carefully line up a Ranged Attack. When you do so, you ignore all Cover bonuses to your target's Reflex Defense on your next Attack. You still must have line of sight to the target, however.

You lose the benefits of Aiming if you lose line of sight to your target or if you take any other Action before making your Attack. Aiming provides no benefit when making an Area Attack.

Careful Shot Edit

If you have the Careful Shot feat, you gain a +1 bonus on your Ranged Attack Roll when you take the time to Aim first.

Deadeye Edit

If you have the Deadeye feat, you deal extra Damage when you take the time to Aim first.

Catch a Second Wind Edit

As a Swift Action, you can Catch a Second Wind (See Second Wind above). You can only Catch a Second Wind once per day. Only Heroic characters can Catch a Second Wind; Nonheroic characters, objects, devices, and Vehicles cannot.

Extra Second Wind Edit

If you have the Extra Second Wind feat, you can Catch a Second Wind an additional time per day (But never more than once in a single encounter). A Nonheroic character that takes the Extra Second Wind feat can Catch a Second Wind once per day.

Drop an Item Edit

Dropping an Item is a Swift Action (But picking one up is a Move Action). You can Drop an Item so that it falls on the ground in your fighting space or lands in an adjacent square.

Fall Prone Edit

Falling into a Prone position requires a Swift Action.

Acrobatic Fall Edit

If you are Trained in the Acrobatics skill, you can Fall Prone as a Free Action with a successful DC 15 Acrobatics check.

Recover Edit

3 Swift Actions

You can spend three Swift Actions in the same Round or across consecutive Rounds to move +1 step on the Condition Track (See Condition Track above). You cannot use the Recover Action while afflicted by a Persistent Condition (See Persistent Conditions above).

Switch Weapon Mode Edit

Some weapons have multiple weapon modes. Examples include the Blaster Pistol, witch has both a lethal setting and a Stun setting, and a Blaster Carbine, which has both a single-shot mode and an Autofire mode. Switching to another weapon mode takes a Swift Action.

Special Combat Rules Edit

This section describes various special rules that arise during combat. The rules are presented alphabetically by topic.

Area Attacks Edit

Certain weapons and effects, such as Grenades, Autofire weapons, or the Force Slam Power, target all creatures in a given Area instead of a single target.

When you make an Area Attack, you make a single Attack Roll; if your Attack Roll is equal to 10 or higher, compare the result to the Reflex Defense of every target in the Area. Creatures you Hit take full Damage, and creatures you miss take half Damage. A natural 20 on an Area Attack Roll automatically hits all targets within the affected Area, but Area Attacks do not deal double Damage on a Critical Hit.

Autofire Weapons Edit

A weapon set on Autofire targets a 2-square by 2-square Area (See Autofire below).

Burst Radius Edit

Grenades and explosives usually have a Burst Radius. When you make an Area Attack with such a weapon, you must decide where to center the Burst before you make the Attack Roll. The center of a Burst is always the corner of a square (At the "Crosshairs").

Splash Weapons Edit

Some weapons have a Splash Radius. When you make an Attack against a target, that target takes full Damage if your Attack Roll exceeds it's Reflex Defense, and half Damage if the Attack misses. Also compare your Attack Roll against the Reflex Defense of every target adjacent to the primary target; these adjacent targets take half Damage if the Attack hits, or no Damage if the Attack misses.

Evasion Edit

A character with the Evasion talent takes half Damage from a successful Area Attack, and takes no Damage from an Area Effect that that misses their Reflex Defense.

Attacks of Opportunity Edit

If an opponent moves out of a square adjacent to you, or performs an Action that forces them to let down their guard, you can make a single, immediate Attack against that opponent (Even if you've already acted during the Round). This is called an Attack of Opportunity.

You can only make Attacks of Opportunity with Melee Weapons, Natural Weapons, Pistols, Carbines, and any weapon with a Folded Stock. You may also make Attacks of Opportunity while Unarmed if you have the Martial Arts I feat.

Attacks of Opportunity I
Luke Skywalker moves 1 square and Attacks Royal Guard A. He provokes an Attack of Opportunity from Royal Guard B.

Provoking an Attack of Opportunity Edit

Two Actions can Provoke Attacks of Opportunity:

  • Moving out of a Threatened Square.
  • Performing an Action that distracts you from defending yourself, and lets your guard down while in a Threatened Square.

Most characters Threaten the squares adjacent to them; larger creatures Threaten all squares within their Reach (See Reach below). A creature only Threatens an area if it is armed with a Natural Weapon, a Melee Weapon, a Pistol, a Carbine, or any weapon with a Folded Stock.

Moving out of a Threatened Square Edit

When you Move out of a Threatened Square, you generally Provoke an Attack of Opportunity. You do not Provoke an Attack of Opportunity if you use the Withdraw Action (See Withdraw above), or if you successfully Tumble. Involuntary movement, such as being the target of a Bantha Rush or the Move Object Force Power, never provoke Attacks of Opportunity.

Attacks of Opportunity II
Mace Windu moves more than 1 square and Attacks the Rancor with his lightsaber. Mace Provokes Attacks of Opportunity from both Tusken Raider A and Tusken Raider B (Who are armed with Gaffi Sticks) as he moves out of their Threatened Squares. He also Provokes an Attack of Opportunity from the Rancor as he moves through it's Threatened Area (The Rancor has Reach).
Performing an Action that Distracts You Edit

Some Actions, when performed in a Threatened Area, Provoke Attacks of Opportunity because they make you divert your attention from the fight at hand. The following Actions Provoke Attacks of Opportunity:

  • Making an Unarmed Attack without the Martial Arts I feat
  • Aiming
  • Loading a Weapon
  • Picking up an Item
  • Retrieving a Stored Item
  • Moving into an Opponent's Square
  • Using any Skill that distracts you or forces you to drop your guard (GM's determination)

Making Attacks of Opportunity Edit

An Attack of Opportunity is a single free Attack, and you can only make one Attack of Opportunity per Round. You don't have to make an Attack of Opportunity if you don't want to. An Attack of Opportunity is always made at your Full Attack Bonus, minus any situational penalties you suffer.

You can't make an Attack of Opportunity if you're Flat-Footed.

Combat Reflexes Edit

If you have the Combat Reflexes feat, you can make more than one Attack of Opportunity during a Round. However, you may only make one Attack of Opportunity per Provoking Action. (Moving any number of squares is treated as a single Provoking Action.)

Autofire Edit

Any ranged weapon that has an Autofire setting can be set on Autofire as a Swift Action. Some weapons, such as the E-Web Repeating Blaster, operates only in Autofire mode.

Autofire is treated as an Area Attack (See Area Attacks above). You target a 2-square by 2-square Area, make a single attack roll at a -5 penalty, and compare the result to the Reflex Defense of every creature in the Area. Creatures you hit take full Damage, and the creatures you miss take half Damage. Autofire consumes ten shots or slugs, and it can only be used if the weapon has ten shots or slugs in it.

Autofire-Only Weapons Edit

If you are using an Autofire-Only Weapon, you may Brace your weapon by taking two Swift Actions in the same Round immediately before making your Attack. When you Brace an Autofire-Only Weapon, you take only a -2 penalty on your Attack Roll when making an Autofire Attack or using the Burst Fire feat (See Burst Fire below).

Only Heavy Weapons, Rifles, and Pistols with an Extended Stock can be Braced.

Burst Fire Edit

The Burst Fire feat allows you to use a weapon set on Autofire against a specific target instead of an Area. You take a -5 penalty on your Attack Roll, but deal +2 dice of Damage. Using Burst Fire expends only half as many shots or slugs (Five instead of ten). This is not considered an Area Attack, so the Damage cannot be reduced using the Evasion talent (See Evasion below).

Evasion Edit

A character with the Evasion talent takes half Damage from a successful Autofire Attack, and takes no Damage from an Autofire Attack that misses their Reflex Defense.

Concealment Edit

Concealment encompasses all circumstances where nothing physically blocks a blow or shot, but where something interferes with an attacker's accuracy. An Attack that would normally hit, might actually miss because the target has Concealment. A target might gain Concealment from fog, smoke, poor lighting, tall grass, foliage, or other effects that make it difficult to pinpoint the target's location.

To determine whether your target has Concealment from your Ranged Attack, choose a corner of your square. If any line from this corner to any corner of the target's square passes through a square or border that provides Concealment, the target has Concealment. When making a Melee Attack against an adjacent target, your target has Concealment if their space is entirely within an effect that grants Concealment (Such as a cloud of smoke).

If you Attack a target with Concealment, you take a -2 penalty on your Attack Roll. Multiple sources of Concealment (Such as a defender in a fog at night, with no illumination) no not apply additional penalties.

If you attempt to notice a target with Concealment, you take a -5 penalty on your Perception check.

Ignoring Concealment Edit

Concealment isn't always effective. For instance, a character with Low-Light Vision ignores Concealment from darkness (But not Total Concealment; see below). Likewise, a character with Darkvision ignores all Concealment from darkness (Even Total Concealment).

Fog, smoke, foliage, and other obstructions work normally against characters with Darkvision or Low-Light Vision.

Total Concealment Edit

If you have line of effect to a target, but not line of sight (For instance, if they are in total darkness or if you are Blinded), they are considered to have Total Concealment from you. You can't Attack an opponent that has Total Concealment, though you can Attack into a square that you think they occupy. If you Attack a target with Total Concealment, you take a -5 penalty on your Attack Roll. You can't make Attacks of Opportunity against an opponent with Total Concealment, even if you know what square or squares the opponent occupies.

If you attempt to notice a target with Total Concealment, you take a -10 penalty on your Perception check.

Cover Edit

Creatures and terrain features can provide Cover against Attacks. A creature with Cover gains a +5 Cover bonus to their Reflex Defense, no matter how many creatures and terrain features are between it and the attacker. Terrain features that provide Cover include trees, walls, Vehicles, and cargo crates. A target with Cover or Improved Cover takes no Damage from Area Attacks if the Attack Roll is less than the target’s Reflex Defense. For a Burst or Splash weapon, determine Cover relative to the center of the weapon's Area of Effect. For an Autofire weapon, determine Cover relative to the attacker.

To determine whether an opponent has Cover, choose one corner of the attacker's square. If any line from this corner to any corner of the target's square passes through a barrier or any square occupied by a creature, the target has Cover. The target does not have Cover if the line runs along or touches the edge of a wall or other square that would otherwise provide Cover.

An adjacent opponent never has Cover.

Cover
A line that runs along a wall or that that nicks a corner of a wall does not provide Cover. Stormtrooper A does not have Cover from Han Solo. Stormtrooper B does not have Cover from Princess Leia. Han and Leia do not have Line of Sight to one another.

Big Creatures and Cover Edit

Any creature with a Fighting Space larger than 1 square determines Cover against melee attacks slightly differently than smaller creatures. Such a creature can choose any square that it occupies to determine whether an opponent has Cover against melee attacks. Similarly, when making a melee attack against such a creature, you can pick any of the squares it occupies to determine whether it has Cover against you.

Cover and Attacks of Opportunity Edit

You can't make an Attack of Opportunity against an opponent with Cover relative to you.

Cover and Stealth Checks Edit

You can use Cover to make a Stealth check. Without Cover, you usually need Concealment (See Concealment above) to make a Stealth check.

Low Objects and Cover Edit

Low Objects provide Cover to creatures in those squares. However, the attacker ignores Low Objects in it's own Fighting Space and adjacent squares. Low Objects in the attacker's space and in adjacent squares don't provide Cover to opponents; essentially, the attacker shoots over them.

Improved Cover Edit

In some cases, Cover may provide a greater bonus to Reflex Defense. For instance, a character peering around a corner, or through a narrow aperture has even better Cover than a character standing behind a low wall, or a Land-Speeder. In such situations, double the normal Cover bonus to Reflex Defense (+10 instead of +5). Furthermore, Improved Cover provides a +5 bonus on Stealth checks.

The GM may impose other penalties or restrictions to attacks depending on the details of the Cover. For example, to strike effectively through a gun port, you need to use a long thrusting weapon, such as a Lightsaber. A Vibro-Ax just isn't going to get through a narrow slit.

Total Cover Edit

If you don't have a line of effect to your target (For instance, if they are completely behind a high wall), they are considered to have Total Cover from you. You can't make an attack against a target that has Total Cover.

Damage Reduction (DR) Edit

A creature or object with Damage Reduction (DR) ignores a certain amount of Damage every Attack. The amount of Damage it ignores is always indicated; for example, an object with DR 10 ignores the first 10 points of Damage from each Attack.

Damage Reduction is sometimes bypassed by one or more specific Damage Types (Noted after the DR value). For example, a creature with DR 5/Energy ignores 5 points of Damage from any source except one that deals Energy Damage (Such as from a blaster). Similarly, a creature with DR 10/Piercing or Slashing ignores 10 points of Damage from any source except one that deals Piercing or Slashing Damage.

Certain Talents grant Damage Reduction. When a character with multiple types of Damage Reduction takes Damage, use whichever Damage Reduction value most benefits the character, based on the type of Damage. For example, if a character with DR 1 and DR 10/Energy is struck by a blaster, it's better for the character to apply their DR 1 against the Attack (Since DR 10/Energy is bypassed by a blaster).

Lightsabers Edit

Lightsabers ignore Damage Reduction unless specifically noted otherwise.

Diagonal Movement Edit

Moving Diagonally costs double. When moving or counting along a diagonal path, each diagonal step counts as 2 squares, as shown in the diagram below. If a character moves diagonally through Low Objects or Difficult Terrain, the cost of movement doubles twice (That is, each square counts as 4 squares).

A character can't move diagonally past the corner or end of a wall that extends to a grid center.

Diagonal Movement
Moving Diagonally cost double. A character can't move Diagonally past a corner or the end of a wall. Moving through Low Objects or Difficult Terrain also costs double. If a character moves Diagonally through Low Objects, the cost of movement doubles twice.

Difficult Terrain Edit

Broken ground, buckled deck plating, and similar obstacles are collectively refereed to as Difficult Terrain. It costs twice as much to move into a square containing Difficult Terrain. Creatures of Large size and bigger must pay the extra cost for moving across Difficult Terrain if any part of their Fighting Space moves into such a square.

Difficult Terrain does not block Line of Sight or provide Cover.

Encumbrance and Speed Edit

Wearing Medium or Heavy Armor or carrying a Heavy Load reduces your character's Speed to three-quarters normal (4 squares if your Base Speed is 6 squares, or 3 squares if your Base Speed is 4 squares). While wearing Heavy Armor or carrying a Heavy Load, you can only Run at triple your Speed (Instead of quadruple).

A character with a Fly Speed cannot Fly while carrying a Heavy Load.

Fighting Space Edit

The squares that a creature occupies on the Battle Map are collectively refereed to as it's Fighting Space. Small and Medium creatures (Including most characters) have a Fighting Space of 1 square. Large creatures have a Fighting Space of 4 squares (2 squares on a side). Huge creatures have a Fighting Space of 9 squares (3 squares on a side). Gargantuan and Colossal creatures have much larger Fighting Spaces.

Flanking Edit

If you are making a Melee Attack against an opponent and you have an ally on the other side of an opponent so that the opponent is directly between the two of you, you are Flanking that opponent. You gain a +2 Flanking bonus on your Melee Attack Roll. See the diagrams below for examples of Flanking.

You don't gain a Flanking bonus when making a Ranged Attack.

Flanking I
Flanking II
Anakin Skywalker and Obi-Wan Kenobi are Flanking the Super Battle Droid. They each gain a +2 Flanking bonus on Melee Attacks against the Droid. Ki-Adi-Mundi and Agen Kolar are Flanking the Dwarf Spider Droid. They each gain a +2 Flanking bonus on Melee Attacks against the Droid.

Helpless Opponents Edit

A Helpless Opponent- one who is bound, sleeping, unconscious, or otherwise at your mercy- is an easy target. You can sometimes approach a target that is unaware of your presence, get adjacent to it, and treat it as Helpless. If the target is in combat or some other tense situation, and therefore in a sate of acute awareness and readiness, or if the target can use it's Dexterity bonus to improve it's Reflex Defense, then that target can't be considered unaware. Furthermore, any reasonable precautions taken by the target- including stationing bodyguards, placing it's back to the wall, or being able to make Perception checks- also precludes catching that target unaware and Helpless.

Attacking a Helpless Opponent Edit

A Melee Attack against a Helpless Opponent gains a +5 bonus on the Attack Roll (Equivalent to attacking a Prone target). A Ranged Attack gets no special bonus. In addition, a Helpless Opponent can't add it's Dexterity bonus (If any) to it's Reflex Defense. In fact, it's Dexterity score is treated as if it were 0, so it's Dexterity modifier to Reflex Defense is -5.

Ion Damage Edit

Ion Pistols and Ion Rifles emit powerful bursts of electrostatic energy that can Disable Droids, Vehicles, and electrical devices in much the same way that Stun Weapons can incapacitate living creatures.

When you make a successful Attack with a weapon that deals Ion Damage, first subtract half of the Ion Damage from the target's Hit Points. Creatures that do not have Cybernetic Prosthetics are singed by the Ion energy, but suffer no other ill effects. Droids, Vehicles, electronic devices, and cybernetically enhanced creatures may suffer additional effects, as noted below:

  • If the Ion Damage reduces the target's current Hit Points to 0, the target moves -5 steps on the Condition Track and is either Disabled or knocked Unconscious.
  • If the Ion Damage (Before being halved) equals or exceeds the target's Damage Threshold, the target moves -2 steps on the Condition Track.

Line of Sight Edit

A character can target an opponent that they see, which is to say, any opponent within their Line of Sight. Draw an imaginary line from any point in the attacker's Fighting Space to any point in the target's Fighting Space. If the player who controls the attacking character can draw that line without touching a square that provides Total Cover (A wall, closed door, or similar barrier) or Total Concealment (Thick smoke, total darkness, or anything else that prevents visibility), that character has a Line of Sight to the target.

A line that nicks a corner or runs along a wall does not provide Line of Sight. Other characters and creatures, Low Objects, Difficult Terrain, and pits do not block Line of Sight.

Line of Sight
Two characters have Line of Sight to each other if there's at least one clear line between their spaces. A line that nicks a corner or runs along a wall does not provide Line of Sight. A character needs Line of Sight to an opponent to Attack that opponent. Han Solo has Line of Sight to Stormtrooper A, but not to Stormtrooper B.

Line of Effect Edit

Line of Effect works just like Line of Sight, but it ignores squares that provide Total Concealment. For example, a character who is blind or in total darkness doesn't have Line of Sight to any target, but that character has Line of Effect to any target that doesn't have Total Cover.

Moving Through Occupied Squares Edit

Sometimes you can pass through an occupied square.

Ally Edit

You can move through a space occupied by any character, creature, or Droid that doesn't consider you an opponent.

Dead or Unconscious Enemy Edit

You can move through a square occupied by an enemy that doesn't present an obstacle, such as one who is Dead, Unconscious, or Disabled.

Much Larger or Smaller Enemy Edit

Any character can move through a space occupied by an enemy three or more size categories larger or smaller than the moving character.

Tumbling Edit

A character Trained in Acrobatics can attempt to Tumble through an enemy's Fighting Space.

Prone Targets Edit

Various Attacks, Talents, Feats, and Force Powers can knock a character Prone. A Prone character takes a -5 penalty on Melee Attack Rolls. Melee Attacks made against a Prone character gain a +5 bonus, while Ranged Attacks against a Prone character take a -5 penalty. Being Prone may also give a character Total Cover instead of normal Cover (For example, being Prone behind a low wall), subject to the GM's discretion.

Reach Edit

A creature's Reach determines the distance it can Reach when making a Melee Attack. A creature Threatens all squares within it's Reach. Small and Medium characters have a Reach of 1 square, which means they can make Melee Attacks only against targets in adjacent squares. Larger creatures tend to have a greater Reach and, respectively, a bigger Threatened Area.

Bigger Creatures Edit

A creature with greater-than-normal Reach (More than 1 square) can still attack opponents directly next to it. A creature with greater than normal Reach usually an Attack of Opportunity against an opponent when the opponent approaches it, because the opponent must enter and move within it's Threatened Area before making a Melee Attack.

Smaller Creatures Edit

A Fine, Diminutive, or Tiny creature must be in your space to Attack you; moving into your square provokes an Attack of Opportunity. You can Attack into your own space if you need to with a Melee Attack (But not a Ranged Attack), so you can Attack very small opponents normally.

Shield Rating (SR) Edit

Some Droids, devices, and Vehicles have a Shield Rating (SR). Whenever a target with SR takes Damage from an Attack, reduce the Damage by the Shield Rating. The remaining Damage (If any) is dealt to the target's Hit Points, subtracting Damage Reduction normally.

Shield Damage Edit

If the Damage dealt by an Attack exceeds the target's SR, reduce the Shield Rating by 5. This reduction is cumulative, so a target's Shield Rating can eventually be reduced to zero. A character may recharge the Shields of a device or Vehicle by spending three Swift Actions on the same or consecutive Rounds to make a DC 20 Mechanics check; if the check succeeds, the target's SR improves by 5 points (Up to it's normal maximum). A Droid may recharge it's own Shields by spending three Swift Actions on the same or consecutive Rounds to make a DC 20 Endurance check; if the check succeeds, it's current Shield Rating improves by 5 points (Up to it's normal maximum).

Shooting or Throwing into a Melee Edit

If you shoot a Ranged Weapon or Throw a Weapon at an opponent that is adjacent to one or more of your allies, you take a -5 penalty on your Attack Roll. This penalty accounts for the fact that you're trying not to hit your allies.

Precise Shot Edit

If you have the Precise Shot feat, you don't take this penalty.

Special Initiative Actions Edit

Usually you act as soon as you can in combat, but sometimes you want to act later, at a better time, or in response to the Actions of someone else.

Delay Edit

By choosing to Delay, you take no Action when your turn in the Initiative order arrives. Instead, you act normally at whatever later Initiative point you decide to act. When you Delay, you voluntarily reduce your own Initiative count for the rest of the encounter. When your new, lower Initiative count comes up later in the same Round, you can act normally. You can specify this new Initiative result or just wait until some time later in the Round and act at that time, thus fixing your new Initiative result at that point.

Delaying is useful if you need to see what your friends or opponents are going to do before deciding what to do yourself. The price you pay is lost Initiative. You never get back the time you spend waiting to see what's going to happen.

Example: Deel and Vor'en approach a locked hatch, behind which they expect to encounter a crime boss and his thugs. Vor'en's Initiative result is 22, but he delays. He wants to open fire on the crime boss with his Heavy Blaster Rifle, so he Delays. On Initiative count 14, Deel uses his Mechanics skill to unlock and open the door. Now Vor'en can move through the doorway and fire a shot at the crime boss, but his Initiative is reduced to 13 (Just after Deel's Initiative of 14). For the rest of the battle, Vor'en acts on Initiative count 13.

Multiple Characters Delaying Edit

If multiple characters Delay their Actions, the one with the highest Initiative check modifier has the advantage. If two or more Delaying characters both want to act on the same Initiative count, the one with the highest Initiative check modifier gets to go first.

Ready Edit

Readying lets you prepare to take an Action later, after your turn is over, but before your next turn has begun. You can ready as a Standard Action. To do so, specify the Standard, Swift, or Move Action you will take and the circumstances under which you will take it. Then, any time before your next turn, you may take the Readied Action as a Reaction in response to those circumstances (Assuming they occur).

Initiative Consequences of Readying Edit

The count on which you took your readied Action becomes your new Initiative result. If you come to your next Action and have not yet performed your Readied Action, you don't get to take the Readied Action (Though you can Ready the same Action again). If you take your Readied Action in the next Round, before your regular Action, your Initiative rises to that new point in the order of battle, and you do not get your regular Action in that Round.

Example: Kelko and his friend Sia-Lan have just encountered a trio of Tusken Raiders in the wilds of Tatooine. On Initiative count 14, Kelko specifies that he is going to fire his blaster at the first Tusken Raider that tries making an Attack. On count 10, Sia-Lan moves next to Kelko and readies an Attack with her Lightsaber, so that she can strike any foe that comes within 1 square of her position. On count 7, the Tusken Raiders charge, brandishing their Gaffi Sticks. As soon as the lead Tusken Raider raises his weapon, Kelko fires his blaster, but misses. Next, Sia-Lan swings at the first Tusken Raider to reach her and drops him. Other Tusken Raiders, however, reach Sia-Lan and Attack her. From this point on, both Kelko and Sia-Lan act on Initiative count 7 (And before the Tusken Raiders).

Squeezing Edit

Creatures of Large size and bigger can squeeze through small openings and down narrow hallways that are at least half as wide as their Fighting Space, provided they end their movement in an area that they can normally occupy. Big Droids and Vehicles can't squeeze at all, unless they can compress their frames to accommodate the tighter space.

Creatures of Large size or bigger can't squeeze past opponents.

Stunning Edit

Sometimes you'd rather knock an opponent Unconscious than kill them. That's why many weapons have Stun settings and why Stun Batons and Stun Grenades are popular with law enforcement agencies throughout the galaxy.

Various Melee Weapons and Blasters have a Stun setting, and switching a weapon to it's Stun setting (Or resetting it to normal Damage) is a Swift Action. Some Stun weapons, such as Stun Grenades, only have a Stun setting. Unless otherwise noted, the Stun setting on a blaster weapon has a maximum range of 6 squares (No Range penalties).

Only creatures can be Stunned. Droids, Vehicles, and objects are immune to Stunning effects.

When you make a successful Attack with a weapon that deals Stun Damage, subtract half of the Stun Damage from the target's Hit Points. Additional effects may occur as well, depending on the amount of Damage dealt:

  • If the Stun Damage reduces the target's current Hit Points to 0, the target moves -5 steps on the Condition Track and is knocked Unconscious.
  • If the Ion Damage (Before being halved) equals or exceeds the target's Damage Threshold, the target moves -2 steps on the Condition Track.

A creature knocked Unconscious by a Stunning effect does not die if it rolls a natural 1 on it's Constitution check to regain Consciousnesses or if it fails the check by 5 or more points. It simply remains Unconscious.

Unarmed Attacks Edit

Striking for Damage with punches, kicks, and headbutts is essentially like Attacking with a Melee Weapon. Unarmed Attacks deal normal Bludgeoning Damage.

A Medium creature normally deals 1d4 points of Bludgeoning Damage (Plus Strength modifier) with a successful Unarmed Attack; A Small creature deals 1d3 points of Bludgeoning Damage (Plus Strength modifier). Certain Talents, Feats, or special abilities may increase the Damage a character deals with their Unarmed Attacks.

Additional Additional Character Combat Resources Edit

The below references are fan-made references to summarize specific rule sets into comprehensive compilations.

  • Grappling 101- A compilation of the Grapple and Grab rules for easy reference by players.